Five Lessons for Leaders from Montessori

Photo courtesy of American Montessori Society

Photo courtesy of American Montessori Society

Employee engagement in the US has just hit a new all-time low.  According to a recent Gallup poll, only 30% of workers are “engaged, or involved in, enthusiastic about, and committed to their workplace.”  The other 70% have checked out or are actively disengaged.  The cost of this loss of potential is estimated at $550 billion annually.  What can you do about it?  Here are five lessons for leaders, borrowed from Montessori, a revolutionary method of education which achieves notably higher levels of engagement amongst students.

  1. Make work harder.  The massive underpinning of Montessori is intrinsic motivation.  People are wired to want to solve problems and tackle challenges.  Everyone loses interest if work is too easy.  Are your employees spending a majority of time doing repetitive tasks that could be automated or eliminated altogether?  Challenge your team to find ways to stop the madness and use their time to take on bigger problems.
  2. Ask questions rather than providing answers.  Rich Sheridan, co-founder and CEO of Menlo Innovations, tells a great story about the time his eight-year-old daughter came to work for the day. Her observation?  You tell people what to do all day.  Rich’s revelation was that he was a bottleneck.  Rich changed his approach, and you can too.  Get out of the way.  Challenge your team by asking questions and offering resources rather than giving the answers.
  3. Create an environment where people want to be.  As part of a client engagement to improve workplace culture, I toured a pharmaceutical plant where workers toiled in dingy grey cubes and tiny offices without windows.  Meanwhile, the cafeteria had big glass windows overlooking the scenic surrounding hillsides.  Employees spent seven hours in the dingy part, and one hour in the nice part.  I suggested relocating everyone to the cafeteria.  What shifts could you make to make your space make inviting?
  4. Take time to see.  Montessori teachers are keen observers.  Most of their time in the classroom is spent listening, not talking.  Teachers intervene when necessary, offer new opportunities when appropriate, and remark on progress made.  Are you truly aware of what’s going on with your team?  Do you know who needs a new challenge?  Do you comment on the good things you see?
  5. Be an advocate for resources.  Montessori schools lack textbooks, offering instead a wide range of materials and real-world resources in the community as the tools of learning and growth.  Does your team have what it needs to succeed?  Ask.  Find out what it would take for your team to unleash its potential, and then figure out a way to provide it.

Pam Daniels is an innovator, designer, and writer based in Chicago.  She has held leadership positions at Leo Burnett, Starcom MediaVest Group, and IDEO.  Her upcoming book, Designed to Thrive: How Montessori methods are transforming the workplace tells the story of innovative organizations who are leading the way.

Advertisements

3 Comments

  1. Exactly what our economy and our business sector needs, a disruptive and transformative boost to adapt to the new high-availability information world we live in.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s